• The church in early medieval Ireland in the light of recent archaeological excavations

As previous volumes in this excellent series have demonstrated, our understanding of Ireland’s early medieval archaeology has been transformed by discoveries made as a result of pre-development excavations during the ‘Celtic Tiger’ boom. We now have far richer evidence for the diverse character and chronology of, for example, burial, settlement and craft activity. Ecclesiastical sites were places where these various activities came together. Indeed, along with their religious significance, it was perhaps partly because they combined crucial, mutually supporting functions (settlement, burial, ritual) that church sites had the potential to become fixed points in the landscape; many of them remained in use throughout the Middle Ages, sometimes even to the present day. As a result they are among our most tangible links to the early medieval past. There is, of course, a danger that familiarity could cloud our judgements and encourage us to slip into lazy assumptions. In approaching these sites, we must remember that perceptions of them, and interactions with them, have changed radically over the course of the millennium and a half that separates us from the people who set about founding them. Despite a veneer of familiarity, they should be considered almost as alien from our experience as a crannog or a royal ceremonial complex. This publication brings to five the number of volumes in the series ‘Research papers in Irish archaeology’. So far, more than 130 individuals have contributed to over 100 essays covering 2,000 years of human activity in Ireland, from the Iron Age to the later medieval period. The essays have dealt with sites in 24 different counties, from Antrim to Kerry and from Donegal to Wexford. The present volume on the early church in Ireland is a fruit of the one-day seminar on the same theme held in the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland in Dublin on 20 November 2010. Many of the papers given that day have resulted in essays in the book, while a number of additional contributions are also included. Chris Corlett is an archaeologist with the Department of Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht. He is the author of numerous works, most recently of Inscribing the landscape, the rock art of south Leinster, Darkest Dublin: the story of the Church Street disaster and Unearthing the archaeology of Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown Dr Michael Potterton is an editor with Four Courts Press and author of Medieval Trim: history and archaeology and with Margaret Murphy The Dublin region in the middle ages: settlement, land-use and economy. Extent: 300 pp Price: €30 (SAVE €10 when you avail of our pre-publication offer) Size: 215 x 279 portrait 200 colour and mono images Paperback Supported by The Heritage Council, The Discovery Programme, The National Roads Authority and the Department of Arts Heritage and the Gaeltacht

Details
Author Michael Potterton and Chris Corlett (eds)
Publication Data December 2014
Subjects Archaeology, excavation

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The church in early medieval Ireland in the light of recent archaeological excavations

  • ISBN: 978 1 905569 89 2
  • Author(s): Michael Potterton and Chris Corlett (eds)
  • Availability: In Stock
  • €30.00


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